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Running Tips

Tips for Shoe Buying


Overpronator

Choose Motion Control

Characteristics: Feet roll in, low arches, knees move towards each other in the middle when bending.You quickly break down midsoles. Foot strikes on the outside of the heel and rolls inward (pronates) excessively.

Injuries: Knee pain, IT band, Plantar Fasciitis

Best Last:Straight or semi-curved for maximum rear foot stability as well as medial & lateral support.

Best Shoe: Motion-control or strong Stability shoes with firm midsoles, a wide landing base, and control features like a strong, rigid heel counter to keep the heel secure and reduce the degree of pronation as well as a posting on the medial side for added motion control.

Supinator

Choose Neutral

Characteristics: Feet roll to outside, arches are high and/or rigid which usually do not pronate enough, knees stay neutral or move outwards through foot strike. Shoe wears along the outside of the sole.

Injuries: Stress fractures, knee and or shin pain

Best Last: Curved, slip-lasted shoe for low or moderate rear foot stability.

Best Shoe: Neutral/Cushioning shoes with no pronation control or extra stability features

Normal Pronator

Choose Stability

Characteristics: Feet roll in, low arches, knees move towards each in the middle when bending.You quickly break down midsoles. Foot strikes on the outside of the heel and rolls inward (pronates) excessively.

Injuries: Stress fractures, knee and or shin pain

Best Last: Semi-Curved

Best Shoe: Stability shoes with moderate control features such as moderate pronation control, moderate heel counters, and a two-density midsole. These provide extra cushioning and some degree of stability.

How to Buy The Right Shoes

Good shoes are still the soundest investment you can make, and coupled with a sensible training schedule essential in helping to prevent injury.

  • Spend time.
    Walk and run in the shoe. Don't buy shoes because they worked well for someone else. Test them out.

  • Take along your old shoes, a pair of running socks and your orthotics.
    Our Running Room staff can "read" your wear pattern, and it is important to be fitted with the same sock you will run in.

  • Tell us...
    About your running history, goals, past injuires, the type of training you do, and what has or hasn't worked for you in the past.

  • Running Room foot exam.
    Whether you have a rigid of flexible foot, a low or high arch, or are flat-footed, makes a difference as to what will best suit you.

  • Comfort.
    Pressure spots or loose fitting shoes will be susceptible to blisters. If your foot slides excessively, you will lose energy on the push off.

  • A snug fit.
    Pull the laces so that you have a feeling of security without discomfort.

  • Selecting the right "last" (footbed construction).
    All shoes are constructed over a wood or composite form called a "last". The three predominant shapes today are the "straight", "curved", and the "semi-curved". If you have a curved foot and wear a straight shoe, you will feel pressure on the inside of your big toe, and you will tend to roll off the outside of the shoe.

  • The selection process.
    Select two or three models that work best for your foot function. Compare the fit of each and then stand, walk around, and run in each shoe to feel how it performs.You will find your new shoes choose you.

  • Running in cross trainers or aerobics shoes?
    Running shoes are designed for a forward motion and cushion the impact specific to running. Cross trainers and aerobic shoes are designed for more lateral support and toe flexibility. If you use them as your running shoes, you'll risk injury.

  • When to buy a new pair.
    Often, a shoe's upper is still in great shape, but the cushioning and motion control has been lost. A test? Mark the date that you bought your shoes, and drop by the Running Room after you have logged approximately 800km or 500 miles to compare your old shoes with a new pair. The key to keeping off the injury list is to replace your shoes once they begin to wear or break down.

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